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Sat, Oct 28, 2006 at 7:15:35 PM | Roof Styles

#1

aq10p


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Our work is considering purchasing REVIT 9 Building or ArchiCAD 10. Had the demo of Revit by the local distributor just the other day - went through a lot guy had some difficulty in modelling a dutch gable roof. He had 1st modelled as a hip - I asked if he could show me a dutch gable and was surprised at the amount of effort involved - the result was less than desirable. Would have thought that there might have been a number of pre-defined roof styles to choose from and select the appropriate one. Just how easy / hard is it to model dutch gable/ melanesian dutch gable, melanesian etc Would not mind seeing a revit file, which I could open here (still have the demo CD) showing various common & not so common roof styles. Our office works primarily on residential buildings & we get asked to do a lot of differnt roof arrangements. I would appreciate any comments - this has been nagging me ever since the demo & will definately influence the decision process. Generally the package seemed impressive - was not so impressed by the guy doing the demo. Thanks in advance Post edited on 2006-10-28 14:17:14

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Sat, Oct 28, 2006 at 8:57:37 PM | RE: Roof Styles

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framerman


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I would say that whatever software you choose, you eventually will run into something that you will have to do a workaround. Personally I feel Revit has what it takes to go far. There's alot of positives to it. They have a huge backing in the industry just from the fact that it's an Autodesk product. It's not entirely compatible with the dwg format, but I think it's getting there. As for your bad experience with the demo, I can't understand what went wrong there. It could be a difference between residential and commercial. I personally design residential and don't have a clue as to what needs to be done for commercial. He might not have known what a dutch gable is. I test drew one to see how long it would take with fascia, soffits, cornerboards, roofing etc, blah blah blah and it took MAYBE 5 minutes. It will take you awhile to get set up comfortably with your family files, your profiles, etc. but Revit is a good program. ArchiCAD is too from my understanding. I think there might be a couple ex ArchiCAD guys here. I'm an ex-SoftPlan person myself.

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dutch gable.jpg

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Sun, Oct 29, 2006 at 1:35:52 AM | RE: Roof Styles

#3

aq10p


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Thanks framerman Your comments much appreciated. Will download your file and have a look with grat interest. You have put my mind a bit more at ease. 5 minutes is very encouraging. Annoying part of demo is that you would expect someone 'experienced' to display a product - really colours what one thinks... Thanks again ---------------------------------------------------------------- PS Can different roof styles be set up in some sort of a template type of file - called up as required - adjusted as needed ?

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Sun, Oct 29, 2006 at 12:53:05 PM | RE: Roof Styles

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latemore


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sounds like your demostrator may not have known the type of roof as the previous post says. here in brisbane australia, we were demonstrated the dutch gable roof as part of our basic learning. sooo easy, but with tricks. i do not think revit can be made to have 'standard' roof types, it depends on your input as regards which side has slope. as a word of encouragement - last year i was trying to figure out how to roof an extension, and used my thoughts for awhile, but it was not working. the roof shape was quite irregular. so i just experimented with putting roof slopes on the edges of the sketch. could not believe it - one of them was a roof that was so elegant, it became used. so the moral is - let revit help you design!

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Mon, Oct 30, 2006 at 1:56:45 PM | Roof Styles

#5

jahern


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To: framerman and aq10p. Pardon my interruption, but in Florida, your attached image is called a 'Boston Hip'. All four sides of your roof have the same SLOPE and the ridge is extended along the narrower sides creating a gable. In a DUTCH GABLE, as well as in the Florida Cracker Roof Style, you would have a change in SLOPE (similar to a barn bldg in Pennsylvania Dutch country). The Dutch roof slope would start at the bearing wall at a high (16/12) pitch, and then change to a shallow pitch (3/12) up to the center ridge line. The Style allowed for more space in the Hay Loft. In the Florida Cracker Home the slopes are just opposite of the Dutch barn. A low slope roof over the front and back porches and higher slopes over the interior living area.

I've just started using Revit so I have not attempted these roof styles, BUT I will need to be able to make these. In Architectural Desktop I've had to use roof slabs to simulate roof breaks. Then I had to CLEAN-UP the elevations and sections after. Not efficient.

Sorry for the intrusion.

Regards, Jack


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Mon, Oct 30, 2006 at 4:09:31 PM | Roof Styles

#6

BS0450


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The only problem that I have had with roofs is not having the ability to trim fascia profiles to roofs they intersect.  I will admit that getting used to building roofs in 3D the way that Revit wants you to is daunting at times but with some practice you will find that it is relatively easy AND efficient.  Some things that I have learned through trial and error:

1. Don't try and make everything in one roof

2. When creating in-fills and/or crickets make them bigger than they need to be join roofs and then pick lines where they intersect.  You'll be able to see them in plan once you join the roofs.  If you can't see it, un-join the roof, join it again and pick the roof  that you picked second, first. 

3. Use elevations to adjust heights if you can't calculate them easily 

4. This one I just learned since it seems you can not enter a negitive slope anymore in 9.1.  Use the 'slope arrow' tool for creating sloped panels that don't have an edge perpendicular to the slope direction. 

 Hope some of this helps.

Brian 


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Tue, Oct 31, 2006 at 3:43:15 AM | Roof Styles

#7

framerman


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to jahern: my apologies. i don't have any architectural schooling. i'm just a framer. someone along the way said "that's a dutch gable" so i've always named it that. the roof you're describing is what I call a gambrel roof. the other one, wow, don't know, but I have seen it. I've never heard of melanesian, I even googled it.

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Wed, Nov 1, 2006 at 3:27:53 PM | Roof Styles

#8

bolandereric


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Just to back up framerman I have always known those roofs to be a gamberl style as well.  Look @ attached file.

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Thu, Nov 2, 2006 at 3:33:46 PM | Roof Styles

#9

MrBob


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Joined: Thu, Oct 19, 2006
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To aq10p

I have been using Revit for about 6 months now, coming from AutoCAD, never used ArchiCAD 10.  Revit is great but it takes alot of practice to get used to.  I am almost to the point where I don't want to use AutoCAD any more, I am the only one in our office so far to work in Revit so when I help others I have to work in AutoCAD.  I have found this site extremely helpful with my Revit work.  Hope this helps.  Smile


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