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Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 8:06:37 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#1

JS10585


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Hello all,

My office is with 10 architects and seeking information how and when we should jump to Revit from AutoCad.

THE boss is the main designer from master plan to SD and others take his files sometime in SD and proceed a project to CD.

I don't think project architects sitting behind my desk are going to create Revit models, but at least they should be able to revise and add notes on the model already created by staffs.

My questions are

1. We had agreed that we better start with a small and simple project.

Which one do you think is better? Only the team should be trained first and then teach others or have another training sessions when others start new job, OR have training sessions all together even though others are not expecting to use Revit in the near future?

2. Project architects vs. staff

Do you think we should have basic training sessions all together and staffs have more extensive ones? Or, any better idea?

3. How long would the training take?

4. Should we hire a consultant? Or we can ask AutoDesk for webinars or online tutorials?

My firm has a contact with AutoDesk and had webinars when AutoCad 2009 was released.

 Thank you in advance.

 


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Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 8:29:55 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#2

WWHub


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We have a staff of 30+ architects.  We started out by having a core group of 6 go to training off-site.  Our first projects were Revit / AutoCAD hybrids.  After the initial 6 became proficient enough to fully use Revit, they then selectively trained the remainder of the staff over the next 18 months. Our staff training was 6 staff at a time, every Friday afternoon for roughly a month. 

 

Obviously, that core group were selected because they were quick learners, were receptive to this new product and were capable of training others. After their initial training, they were quick at learning more of the program on their own as they used it on simple projects.  This core group set up our templates, hold regular lunch and learns and maintain the office library.

 

You are way off base on your who to train issue.  We trained all staff that would be "on the boards".  Revit is not just a modeling / designer program.  You need to understand the program completely to use it effectively.  That means detailers have to understand how the model is built and how to modify it because they will have to

 

Training without using is only 5% effective. 

 

Webinars and tutorials are useful but only after the basics are initially learned.

 

To successfully implement Revit, the powers to be must back the efforts 100%.   If you have strong AutoCAD users, they actually may be a hindrance.  These programs are not the same - the users needs to drop all CAD processes and learn Revit procedures.

 

Good luck and have fun.  After 4+ years of use, our office is not looking back with any regret at all.   


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Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 9:46:58 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#3

JS10585


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Thank you for sharing your experience, WWHub,

 

Starting with a core group sounds great.

 

What I was worried about is I cannot expect how much time project architects who have not any experience with 3D programs. I'm one of the fast learners and other staffs under PAs are proficient with 3D and 2D programs so I'm sure they will learn very quickley.

 

I had online tutorials during holiday and started our new project. I realized that it'll be more efficient if we have a tutor with experiences of similar projects to ours - southern californian stucco boxes.

I guess one project architect, one staff, and our cad admin person can start first when a project gets started.

 

Do you think project architects in their 50's will be able to learn the program soon?


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Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 9:58:04 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#4

WWHub


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You asked "...Do you think project architects in their 50's will be able to learn the program soon?" Regrettably, I'm more than 10 years over your limit.... I started with AutoCAD 2.6 in the 80's and I was one of our core group on revit. I know of others using the product of the same age.  If they adapted to CAD, they can adapt to this.

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Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 10:01:18 PM | Training for a small architecture office

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JS10585


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That's great news WWHub,

 

THE boss of the office is over 70 years old and uses SketchUp as his design tool, but project architects never used it so that's why I was worried.

 

Thank you,

 

 



Edited on: Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 4:09:12 PM

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Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 11:33:37 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#6

itsmyalterego


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My office started with only me in an office of ~10, and I had learned the program in spare time in 2003 because it was "fun" as an intern.  (lucky break) It was kind of a hard fought battle, several architects were very uncomfortable with change.  But now everyone is at least marginally proficient, and 100% of our new projects are beginning under the assumption we'll use revit. It really only takes a week or two of dabbling until someone can begin to pull their weight in a project, requiring only a little bit of over-the-shoulder guidance, and cleanup of their mistakes. 

 

So, we've had no professional training.  In my opinion, training cannot be absorbed quickly enough.  You might get two weekends with an instructor, the instructor will cover everything the program can do, and show you once, and 5% of it will stick.  You'll get back in front of your computer ready to rock, and realize you still don't know how to do anything.  

 

My suggestion would be to learn by doing for a few months, and then go see an instructor, if that pleases the powers that be.  This way, at least you have a good base for standard/better practises to stick to.   Also, having at least one (relative) expert on staff can help.  Maybe it makes sense to give someone a soft workload so they can work on developing their skills, at the risk of jealosy in the workplace... 

 

i would definitely reccommend a small first project.  Our first project was a covered canopy, and all was going well until I had my first experience cleaning up sheets, detailing, annotating, putting in filled regions, struggling with broswer organization so I didn't screw up views on sheets, etc....  moral being, revit's speediness and slowness are awkwardly distributed across the phases of work, it could hurt to get surprised by the work required to "pretty up" a model that was fast to b uild.  

 

Also, on the age matter, The fastest I've seen pick up revit was an 18 year-old.  The second fastest was a 60 year-old.  So it seems to speak pretty well to all ages... it's just an intuitive, sensible way to draft.  



Edited on: Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 5:36:35 PM

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Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 11:53:32 PM | Training for a small architecture office

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In my opinion, there is no doubt that using to work on a project (small project, nothing fancy, something you already know like the back of your hand) on a daily basis will benefit the most.

I have trained and others from my office to get on-board in the past, they just have to work on Revit on a daily basis so the information will stick, and once they are accustomed to do certain things, they can be as efficient as Autocad (or faster)

I have seen someone from 20+ years can learn as fast as the 20-year-old as long as they are commited to it, but you have it give it time for them to use it and don't let them to stop, otherwise, they will likely to forget soon enough.

Philip


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Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 1:44:52 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#8

WWHub


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I want to add that open offices work best when starting Revit.  You need other people using the program and continuous support.  We have an open office area and closed areas.  Staff in the open area are our best Revit users because they verbally interact every day.  They teach each other.  If your staff are in closed areas, even cubes, they will not interact as well and implementation will suffer.

 

And as others have said.... you need to use it continuously.  If you fall back to CAD "to get the job done", then more than likely you will fail in adopting the product.  If you struggle through the problems, you will be quickly rewarded.


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Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 1:59:59 PM | Training for a small architecture office

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You are making the absolute right choice moving to Revit.  It's good to see you have the company's backing.. it will help.

I've guided numerous firms thru the implementation process (that's what they call it).. basically the road you are about to walk to get Revit up and running in your office.

Answers to your queries:

1. Small project is a good idea.  Not something too small though, like a dog house, but a real project.  Do NOT take on a huge complex addition with phasing and complex design features.  Revit could handle it fine, but your team is NOT ready for that challenge (even if they are ambitious and young and ready to run).  Trust me. 

2.  Do NOT train people that are NOT going to use Revit in the near future.. they will forget it and only need more training.  But DO make sure all the PM's and designers get a good OVERVIEW class (a couple hours) to familiarize themselves with the overall concepts and how it's different by way of tasking and project organization.  

3.  Training used to be 3 full days.. but that takes the staff away from their projects too much.  You can get people up and running in Revit in 5 half days.  Yep.. one week.. but only half days.  Your boss will love this because there are things that need to get done.. and totally dedicated for 3 days doesn't make it easier.. infact.. it's a ton of information and your brains will pick it up better in 5 half days.

4. A consultant would be my suggestion.. yes.  A real consultant that KNOWS architecture and how projects go together and knows the design process.  Don't get some nucklehead that only knows how to click icons and how Revit works.  You need a real consultant that knows Architecture.. or you will be spinning your wheels for months.  Eventually you can train the newbees in house (on the second or third project).  But start with a good consultant.  it's worth every penny.  Tutorials are great refreshers.. but don't equal face to face.

Good job getting rolling.. you will be happy when the designers actually realize how easy it is for them to do some preliminary design in Revit and feel comfortable hopping in and helping out.  it' NOT just a drafting program.. Revit is integral in the DESIGN process.. you will see what I mean as you go along.

Mike 

=) 


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Wed, Jan 12, 2011 at 6:59:32 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#10

JS10585


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Your comments really help me to understand how my office can start.

 

Thank you very much everybody,

 

 

 

 


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Tue, Nov 8, 2011 at 6:14:02 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#11

lazydude


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What would you charge to setup home networking for a small office?


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Tue, Nov 8, 2011 at 7:25:48 PM | Training for a small architecture office

#12

WWHub


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Wrong thread for this post....


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Wed, Nov 9, 2011 at 5:32:22 PM | Training for a small architecture office

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THE boss of the office is over 70 years old and uses SketchUp as his design tool, but project architects never used it so that's why I was worried.

If your boss, can draw in sketch up, then he will surely transfer over to Revit rather well, and what he does, will not be lost, the rest of your staff, can follow up behind him and finish the work. This will be really good for him as he will be able to fully understand what his staff is doing.

Good Luck to You,

a 62 year old Engineer.


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