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Sat, Jan 10, 2004 at 11:08:09 PM | Using Revit for a partial renovation

#1

Tiger


Joined: Sat, Jan 10, 2004
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My hope is that this thread can generate a discussion wherein those with more experience can help those of us with little Revit experience understand the best way to address what I am sure is a common challenge...how to work a part of an existing building in Revit. A typical project for our firm involves the renovation of a small portion of a facility. We do a lot of healthcare work and a typical project might involve the renovation of 10k sf of a 150k sf floor plate. We started using Revit exclusively from ADT4 in October. Most of our work is for repeat clients and therefore we typically have ADT or ACAD 2D drawing of the floor plans. We currently are importing the 2d files onto the appropriate level, then "tracing" with Revit to build the affected project area as an exsiting Revit model, then doing our thing with the demolish tool, phasing etc. to document the scope of the new work. We then open the original 2d file and cut out the data within the project area so that we don't have redundant data fighting for visibilty within the project area. Our approach seems cumbersome and awkward. How have you tackled this issue?

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Sun, Jan 11, 2004 at 4:14:37 AM | RE: Using Revit for a partial renovation

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hjacobs


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Tiger, We do a lot of retail interior fitouts of existing shell buildings. We usually get CAD backgrounds of the space and do exactly what you do...just trace over the existing plans where needed. However, we usually don't update the existing CAD backgrounds. Perhaps it might be best if you completed the whole building in Revit if you feel like you might do more work in the building later on...

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Hiroshi Jacobs

The Catholic University of America

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Mon, Jan 12, 2004 at 8:51:08 PM | RE: Using Revit for a partial renovation

#3

TreyWood


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hjacobs, Thanks for the reply. Our difficulty is that the floor plate might be 150k to 200k sf and that is a lot of front end overhead to impose on a small project. What Revit sorely needs is a methd to convert ADT walls & doors rather than the imported overlay view.

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Thu, Jul 24, 2008 at 5:56:42 PM | Using Revit for a partial renovation

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madeforworship


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I agree, that this would be a nice feature.  We are doing a pretty big job right now, app. 250,000 sf. existing builiding (13 story's plus a 4 story parking garage below ground).  We are doing a little bit of exterior renovation and basically gutting the interior and making it apartment space.

 I found that it was easier to manage the entire file in Revit, even though we had to model the exterior of the building.  I was actually able to model about 75% of the exterior in about a day and a half.  The building is fairly simple mirror image in most cases of the elevations, but it was still beneficial for us on this project.

 Plus, the comment about doing future work is very true.  I would think you could market it to the owner in such a way that if you did the entire model in Revit, the owner could see value in you doing future work for them.  Also, if the owner is tech savvy at all, he can buy software that can harness the data from the model for maintenece/upkeep of the building.

I, however, also understand frustrations when you really don't have a whole lot your are doing.  Like I said, ours was a complete gut of the interior pretty much, but in your case, you may be better off in CAD/ADT, even though that sucks.  In the future, we will start getting renovation jobs for buildings that have been done in Revit, which will be nice!

Hope my thoughts help.


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