RevitCity.com Logo

Home  |  Forums  |  Downloads  |  Gallery  |  News & Articles  |  Resources  |  Jobs  |  FAQ  |  SearchSearch  |  Join  |  LoginLogin

Welcome !

174 Users Online (61 Members): Show Users Online - Most ever was 626 - Mon, Jan 12, 2015 at 2:00:17 PM

 

Forums

Forums >> Revit Building >> Technical Support >> 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

Search this ThreadSearch this Thread | Page 1 of 2 | 1 | 2 Next >>

Wed, Jan 25, 2006 at 12:55:31 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#1

isac


active

Joined: Thu, Dec 1, 2005
3 Posts
5 Stars: 2 Votes


Hello community, I need a real (3d) solution, no textures. How to do it. I canīt find any tutorial about it. Thanks

Attached Images

corrugated metal.jpg

This user is offline

 

Wed, Jan 25, 2006 at 3:27:27 PM | RE: 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#2

RevitRenzo


active

Joined: Mon, Jan 9, 2006
20 Posts
3.5 Stars: 3 Votes


You could try I number of things: - use vertical wall sweeps or reveals to do the trickt, with an array that has been grouped.... or - create an In-place Wall family the way you want to

This user is offline

 

Thu, Jan 26, 2006 at 2:59:27 PM | RE:

#3

isac


active

Joined: Thu, Dec 1, 2005
3 Posts
5 Stars: 2 Votes


You could try I number of things:
- use vertical wall sweeps or reveals to do the trickt, with an array that has been grouped....


Good call, thanks

This user is offline

 

Thu, Jan 26, 2006 at 5:36:49 PM | RE: 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#4

TomDorner


active

Joined: Sun, Apr 25, 2004
1207 Posts
4.5 Stars: 24 Votes


If you have attended AU for the past three years like I have, and talk to the Revit founders, they will tell you that trying to model the corrugated siding in 3D is not the thing to do. Maybe for a very small building or small section of a building you can get away with it, but what is really driving your desire or need? Rendering wise a good pattern will usually suffice. In large scale plan sections and details a 2D detail component can be added to show the corrigation. Knowing what level of 3D detail to stop at is part of understanding Revit. As computers increase in power and as Revit grow along with that increase things may change. Until then I would stay away from any attempt to place 3D corregated siding in your Revit project.

-----------------------------------

Tom

www.reviteer.com   http://twitter.com/Reviteer

 

This user is offline

View Website

Mon, Jan 30, 2006 at 5:11:41 AM | RE: 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#5

eldados


site moderator|||
eldados Avatar

Joined: Mon, Mar 14, 2005
777 Posts
4.5 Stars: 8 Votes


I agree with Tom, trying to model it all will be very taxing on your Revit model and computer, a texture will be a good solution, if you really need the 3D and it's a small area, you can use extusion in place maybe...

-----------------------------------

Integrator

Architectural Engineering Construction

KarelCAD

This user is offline

View Website

Mon, Jan 30, 2006 at 5:35:25 PM | RE: 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#6

isac


active

Joined: Thu, Dec 1, 2005
3 Posts
5 Stars: 2 Votes


Yes, I have to agree. It will slowdown viewports a lot and it's very time/task consuming. I found a good texture in this website __http://www.steelselect.com Regards, Isac.

This user is offline

 

Thu, Jun 28, 2007 at 8:50:08 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#7

baez


active

Joined: Thu, Jun 28, 2007
6 Posts
5 Stars: 1 Votes


OK, I'm new to Revit but one of the first problems I encounter is this one described here. We build habitat shelters and structures for offshore drilling platforms which utilize what we call crimp plate as a structural wall. This is not trim it is sometimes 1/4" thick and 4" deep with 18" pitch on center like they use for coastal bulkheads. It needs to be in full 3D. we are also hoping it will be used in the structural analysis. I can model it with sweep or extrude but then I can't edit it to place doors etc. Also modeling this thing with sweep is more time consuming than AutoCad 3D. Now I am hearing that doing this will create a huge file? Maybe Revit ain't so good for this? Come on Gurus, I have found some advice for making some very complicated family wall systems which are parametric such as the Kawneer curtain wall system it can't be that hard or that bit intensive.

This user is offline

 

Thu, Jun 28, 2007 at 10:14:38 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#8

framerman


active

Joined: Tue, Jun 29, 2004
543 Posts
4 Stars: 13 Votes


Can you post a profile image of your metal? I would say, without really seeing what it is exactly, I would create a generic family with a repeating pattern.

This user is offline

View Website

Thu, Jun 28, 2007 at 10:18:23 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#9

framerman


active

Joined: Tue, Jun 29, 2004
543 Posts
4 Stars: 13 Votes


To place your doors, etc, you would need to create voids. Then you would need to make a separate family of your doors/windows..whatever, so it wasn't wall hosted. It would be obviously a more time consuming way to go. Do you need CD's for this or just the model? I know people in Max/Viz that just draw the line profile and extrude to whatever you need and boolean out what you don't.

This user is offline

View Website

Thu, Jun 28, 2007 at 10:26:21 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#10

baez


active

Joined: Thu, Jun 28, 2007
6 Posts
5 Stars: 1 Votes


Here is one of our small buildings and the edge of the crimp plate. This plate is 1/4" thick 4-1/4" high and 18-1/2" pitch between repeating elements. Thanks in advance for any help.

This user is offline

 

Thu, Jun 28, 2007 at 11:00:38 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#11

framerman


active

Joined: Tue, Jun 29, 2004
543 Posts
4 Stars: 13 Votes


How I got to this test model is "create" under the modeling tab. when you select this, it asks you what category you want. select "wall" so now you are making an "in-place family" of a wall. create your profile using array, copy, whatever methods to spped this up. It didn't take me too long, but I don't know how big these are that you need. I offset these so I got an actual wall thickness instead of a huge block of mass.

 

after you create this wall, you may place doors, windows, whatever is necessary. However, since it is corrugated, I had to go back and edit the wall and create some voids to clean up the window opening. It would cut some, but not all of the wall. Revit will see each little leg and assume it's a different wall. Voids are not too hard, so I went with this route. 



Attached Images

24980_corrugated_walls.jpg

This user is offline

View Website

Fri, Jun 29, 2007 at 2:01:11 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#12

baez


active

Joined: Thu, Jun 28, 2007
6 Posts
5 Stars: 1 Votes


Thank you, this looks like a good approach I will give it a run and let you know how it works for us. Revit does seem a little weak in the mechanical design and detail area but maybe they will improve as they find out what peoples needs are and like autocad incorporate the ideas and work arounds created by the people actually using the software.

This user is offline

 

Sat, Jun 30, 2007 at 3:22:52 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#13

sdbrown


active

Joined: Sat, Dec 13, 2003
168 Posts
5 Stars: 3 Votes


I would recommend a curtain wall panel/curtain system for this.  Create the curtain panel with one simple extrusion set to visible in coarse and medium detail, with a surf pattern attached.  The create a second extrusion in the shape of your panel set only to show in fine levels of detail.

 

However I still can't see any reason why this would have to be modelled in 3d.  A surf pattern along with embeded detail components in teh panel family would work just as well.


This user is offline

 

Tue, Jul 3, 2007 at 5:03:20 PM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#14

baez


active

Joined: Thu, Jun 28, 2007
6 Posts
5 Stars: 1 Votes


I am still working on a good approach to this problem. The above reply does demonstrate a big disconnect here however. Although my main background is mechanical and machine design and most of my 3D work has been with AutoCad, Solidworks and Inventor and the like I am not locked into doing something just because thats the way I have always done it (for over 40 years btw, I started on the drawing board and slide rule). However to me the whole point of a 3D program is to allow modelling in real 3D. Revit doesn't really allow this. Why would I want to? Because when I am doing structural design I want to be able to zoom in to a detail and see that everything fits the way I plan. Whats the point otherwise? How can I included bolted details in my model when one of the elements is a cartoon proxy object. How do I draw details of my design components? At our company many of the components are machined to create an accurate fit. If I just have a proxy object I for sure can't create a detail. Sure this program works really good if your design requirements fit neatly within the constructs of the program but the 3D capabilities are Jurasic at best and nonexistant at worst. How this will ever change if the answer is always "Just put in an object with an overaly that looks kind of like what you want" or "Just import your 3D solid and apply your features to the faces of the block you wind up with". Don't get me wrong it is not just the above post I have a problem with because it's not even the 10th time I have recieved such a response. How about this? Why would I not want to model everything in 3D in my new "3D" program. When I create my detail drawings in AutoCad because it is easier and possible what do I do then draw them in 3D AutoCad to check the fit? At the moment that looks like what will happen at our company. The architectural team will like this program and the structural team will work twice as hard trying to create a model they can work in after they design the whole structure in AutoCad. Advanced appologies for ranting but I am frustrated.

This user is offline

 

Wed, Jul 4, 2007 at 12:02:55 AM | 3d Corrugated metal wall - how to do it?

#15

framerman


active

Joined: Tue, Jun 29, 2004
543 Posts
4 Stars: 13 Votes


Revit seems to have been pushed by the resellers as the takeover program of ADT.....which will never happen.

 

I know you are frustrated and it's alright to vent. We all do with this program. It does have immense potential, but it is sorely lacking in modeling. Simple to medium detailed architecture is fine, tricky rounded surfaces are not so gentle. Your original post I thought immediately Inventor oe Solidworks. Curious why you guys went to Revit.

 

It is possible to model what you need (hopefully repeating parts) in the family editor, and insert them when you need to. It is one of the biggest mountains to climb for big companies that have had libraries of ADT files is to make their own content. Revit, while getting better with free files, is sorely behind programs like ADT in content.

 

Just one last word on Revit and rounded surfaces. There is no way to control the faceted surfaces on rounded surfaces yet. This is one of my gripes with Revit. It's not horrible, but when you are detailing curved fascia up close, it's noticeable. 


This user is offline

View Website

Search this ThreadSearch this Thread | Page 1 of 2 | 1 | 2 Next >>



Similar Threads

Thread/Thread Starter

Forum

Last Post

Replies

Corrugated Metal for wall Finish?

Community >> The Studio

Thu, Jan 8, 2015 at 10:01:24 PM

7

Custom Wall Creation Question

Revit Building >> Technical Support

Fri, Jul 24, 2009 at 7:41:46 PM

7

Wall types

Revit Building >> Technical Support

Thu, May 31, 2007 at 8:05:12 PM

0

Corrugate / Profiled Metal Wall & Roof Cladding

Revit Building >> Technical Support

Thu, Sep 22, 2011 at 8:56:30 PM

6

corrugated wall in plan

Revit Building >> Technical Support

Tue, Oct 9, 2007 at 7:00:06 PM

1

Site Stats

Members:

1794958

Objects:

22512

Forum Posts:

151981

Job Listings:

4

Sponsored Ads

Home | Forums | Downloads | Gallery | News & Articles | Resources | Jobs | Search | Advertise | About RevitCity.com | Link To Us | Site Map | Member List | Firm List | Contact Us

Copyright 2003-2010 Pierced Media LC, a design company. All Rights Reserved.

Page generation time: 1.3213

Login

User Name:

Password:

Remember Me  

Forgot Password?

Search Forums

Advanced Search

Search Forums

Advanced Search


Clear Highlights


Clear Highlights